Give Your Dog A Gift That Really Stinks!

pexels-photo-216941.jpeg

Got your dog a brand new toy?
A dinosaur that bleats or a hedgehog that squeaks?
Maybe a bug eyed sheep with little green feet?

How does your dog know it’s a dog toy? Can he read the label?
All you need to accomplish this literary feat is a laundry hamper.
Contrary to popular opinion all dogs are literate.
They read with their noses and insist that all popular dog novels
be prepared in an olfactory factory.

Stuff the new toy into the laundry hamper and let the bleating sheep marinate for a day before presenting it to your dog. Yes, a day long snuggle up with the socks makes the toy undeniably his. The dog’s motto, ‘he who has the most stink wins’ is written with invisible ink on all doggie foreheads.  The more an item is handled, worn or otherwise stunk up by humans the more valued it becomes to dogs. Yes, this is why  remotes are more likely to be chewed than the dictionary.

If dogs could bid on ebay underwear and socks would lead the chase. Pillowcases, those repositories of high stink hair oils, would also be sought after with doggie teeth bared. Shoes, glasses, wallets, and purses are all valued items in the stink parade. If you got the stink then you get the bids.

Plunge those new toys into the holder of all things laundry and watch how well your dog reads. He’ll be a speed chewer with a photographic nose memory for all the toys in his universe.

Dear Dr. Sue

Dear Dr. Sue.png

Hello to Bailey and his family,

     Thanks for the genius compliment...it's more the forty years of understanding the life of tiny breeds that clued me into the problem. As long as he has enough blanket to keep himself warm, he won't wake up through the night. Thanks for buying and reading my book Pee Free. See you in class!

When is a dog behavior actually a canine miscommunication?

Dear Dr. Sue

      We just adopted an older dog from the animal shelter and couldn't be happier. He's a good dog but we've encountered one small behavioral problem that I think may actually be fairly common in rescue dogs. When my seven -year-old son hugs him, our new dog gets tense and growls. He's never actually tried to bite, but I'm worried this could be a sign of future aggressive dog behavior. Otherwise he is always such a loving and sweet dog. What can we do?

 

Sincerely,

   Growly Guy


 

Dear Growly Guy,

     Congratulations on your new addition!  Thanks for giving this dog a second chance. Now, let's give him the best chance.

      Dogs don’t like to be hugged. It's an anti-dog behavior. Sure, your human kid knows that hugging is an expression of love, but that's a human behavior, not a dog behavior. And here in lies our clash of cultures.

     Explain to your son that hugging makes a dog feel trapped. To a dog, a hug feels a lot like a neck hold. When your new pup struggles to escape this uncomfortable embrace, as is a normal dog behavior, your son tightens his hold (a normal kid behavior) thus making your dog nervous and uncomfortable, which is why he growls. It's a classic miscommunication between species. Your son just needs new and better ways to express affection and connect to his new pal.

     Kids like action and so do dogs. My JustForFun Agility will give your son a way to channel all that love, and energy, in a more productive way. Your new dog will learn to follow commands from your son and together they can form a bond through their new dog sports. And there's more than just Agility to choose from- Be sure to check my website at www.suemyles.com/dogsports for all the fun actives I offer for dogs and their humans.

 

     I hope this helps you to understand your dog's behavior a big more clearly. More often than not, I find most of these "problems" tend to be less of a canine behavior problem and more of an inter-species miscommunication!

 

Sincerely,

 Dr. Auntie Sue

Dr. Sue's Ages & Stages Of Puppy Development

puppy.jpeg

Puppies develop rapidly in the first few weeks of their life. It’s important as a puppy parent to know these stages of puppy development and what to expect. A sleepy 6 week old puppy is almost unrecognizable as the zooming, playing, peeing, and biting 14 week old puppy that is soon to come. But, like all the rest, this stage shall soon pass. The prepared puppy parent will know what to expect and when- saving your fingers and your sanity!

 

 

6 – 8 Week Old Stage Of Puppy Development

 

What Does This Age Do?

THEY SLEEP. AND SLEEP SOME MORE.
NEW OWNERS ARE OFTEN BAMBOOZLED INTO THINKING THAT RAISING A PUP IS A BREEZE.

What Do They Need Most?

SLEEP. PHYSICAL CONTACT WITH HUMANS. SLEEP. CONFINEMENT WHERE THEIR CONSTANT, AND UNCONTROLLABLE, PEEING DOESN’T UPSET THE HUMANS. MORE SLEEP.

8 – 10 Week Old Stage Of Puppy Development

 

What Does This Age Do?

PERIODS OF INTENSE ACTIVITY – FOLLOWED BY A ‘CRASH AND BURN’.
THEY EXPLORE THEIR ENVIRONMENT AND FORGET WHERE THEY ARE SUPPOSED TO PEE.

What Do They Need Most?

SUPERVISION BY AN AWAKE AND CARING PERSON.  PATTERNS OF HOUSE TRAINING STARTED WITH NO REAL EXPECTATION THEY CAN FOLLOW IT … YET.

10 – 12 Week Old Stage Of Puppy Development

 

What Does This Age Do?

SLEEP LESS. EXPLORE MORE. SCAVENGE IN THE YARD OR ON WALKS. SWALLOW EVERYTHING THEY SCAVENGE. RESPOND  HAPPILY TO PEOPLE IF HUMANS HAVE BEEN KIND AND PREDICTABLE.

What Does This Age Need?

A PATIENT OWNER. PLAYFUL BITING STARTS IN EARNEST AROUND THIS AGE.

SIMPLE COMMANDS SUCH AS SIT FOR YOUR DINNER, STAY AND COME HERE NEED TO BE ‘INSTALLED’ .

12 – 14 Week Old Stage Of Puppy Development

 

What Does This Age Do?

 LOTS. AND AT HIGH SPEED. PLAYFUL BITING INCREASES AT THIS AGE. JUMPING UP BECOMES THEIR HOBBY. PUPPIES ARE MORE BOLD AND LESS LIKELY TO STICK AT YOUR SIDE –  SO USE A LEASH!

What Does This Age Need?

SOCIALIZATION OUTINGS. DURING THIS AGE IT IS VITAL.

DID YOU DO YOUR FIVE PLACES AND FIFTY PEOPLE SOCIALIZATION EXERCISES THIS WEEK?

14 – 16 Week Old Stage Of Puppy Development

 

What Does This Age Do?

CHEWING ON HARD SURFACES STARTS NOW.

INCREASED INTEREST IN THINGS OTHER THAN YOU WHEN IN A NEW ENVIRONMENT.

What Does This Age Need?

FORCE FREE TRAINING IN MY PUPPY CLASS.

LOTS OF MENTAL BRAIN GAMES AND AN INTRODUCTION TO LOOSE LEASH WALKING.

 

Do– Remember that the ages and stages of puppy development occur in a predictable pattern

Don’t– Wait to enroll in classes where your pup can properly socialize.

Dr. Sue's Socialization Guide for Puppies

When it comes to socialization,

dog and cat.jpg

it isn’t just other dogs your pup needs to meet.

 

Socialization is a big, big
word in the land of puppies. 
Think of all the different experiences your dog will have
in her adult life -locations, noises, activities.
 That’s where to focus your lessons.

 

DR.  SUE’S RULES  FOR SOCIALIZING PUPPIES

 

dog in car.jpeg

Visit five new environments a week.

 Meet fifty kind and interested strangers each week.

All dog to dog interactions should be with leashed dogs of approximately the same size & age.

 

Puppies and Children

dog and child.jpeg

Good children make good puppies.

 Exposure to gentle, engaged and happy-to-meet-a-puppy children helps pups like kids.  Exposure to loud, chasing, cornering kids introduce fear in the pup’s world and can create kid-aggressive dogs.

Pick your pup’s company carefully.

 

 

Do –   Explore and enjoy safe places.

Teach your pup to be at ease away from home.

Start as soon as your vet gives the OK .

 

Don’t– Overwhelm a young pup with too much all at once.

Familiarize her to the world slowly, at her own pace .